Wildlands Restoration Volunteers

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Annual Report FAQ

Are nonprofits required to file an annual report every year?
What is an “In-Kind” contribution?
Do nonprofits make a “profit?”
What is a fee-for-service?
What are WRV’s costs?
Are volunteers free?

Are nonprofits required to file an annual report every year?

No, but nonprofits often voluntarily issue annual reports to stakeholders and constituents, measuring impact for the previous year and publishing expense and revenue analysis.

What is an “In-Kind” contribution?

An In-Kind donation is the gift of an item or service which is not cash, but which has a cash value.

Do nonprofits make a “profit?”

Just like other businesses, nonprofits should generally bring in more revenue  than expenses. Excess income is reinvested in the mission of the organization for the future. Charities may choose to incur short-term deficits for a number of reasons, including expansion of programs or new programs.

What is a fee-for-service?

Many land agency partners and others pay some or all of WRV’s costs for a specific project or training.

What are WRV’s costs?

There are many costs in WRV’s budget which are not related to volunteer labor or expertise, for example materials (e.g. plants, seed, erosion control products, trail materials, fencing materials, etc.), transportation costs, heavy equipment contracting, and more.  WRV also pays for robust financial oversight, strong information technology, leadership development training, and effective management.  WRV’s biggest asset is its people, including volunteers, board members, and staff.

Are volunteers free?

While volunteer time is freely given, there are many costs associated with engaging volunteers in projects.   For instance, substantial effort is needed to recruit volunteers and coordinate them.  Project design and logistics require substantial staff time.  Volunteers need to be outfitted with tools and supplies and covered by adequate insurance.  WRV chooses to feed our volunteers well and provide other forms of volunteer appreciation.  Finally, WRV invests substantial resources into volunteer leader training.  These investments are key components of turning good-will into effective land stewardship.

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